Micro.blog

desparoz
desparoz
I’ve been thinking a little more about what Jack Baty wrote about the notion that likes on social networks should be private. Jack suggests that likes (and faves, and hearts, and…) should be visible only to the “Like-or and the Like-ee”. For the Like-or, Jack’s approach allows them to keep a list of things they have liked, and to send a vote of thanks to the author. The Like-ee receives said vote of thanks[1]. Personally I like the first part – a list of the things I have favourited in a service like micro.blog would be a useful thing. If there was a JSON/RSS feed, or if I could use an API to do something with things I favourite with a service like IFTTT, then I could do useful thing with those Favourited items, such as: add them to a link blog add them to a bookmarking service like Pinboard append the item to a note or next actions list These are good uses of Likes and Favourites. The second part – the vote of thanks – could be a good thing, if (and IMHO ony if) that aspect is private as Jack suggested. The problem I am seeing is that many people put very little thought into Likes ’and Faves. Clicking a link to Like or Favourite favourite takes a single second, and even less thought. People do it routinely, move on and often give no more thought whatsoever to the topic. IMHO, the best way of registering thanks and supporting the efforts of the author is to take a few moments and to write a meaningful reply — perhaps in a comment, or better yet perhaps by making your own (micro) blog post — and linking back to the original. What I am suggesting is to take mindful action, expressing what it is you like in a way that gives real feedback to the author. Sharing is important, because as micro.blog user John Johnston mentioned, curation is important. One of my key personal uses of micro.blog at the moment is as a link blog for interesting things I’ve stumbled on across the web[2]. Sharing has the potential of increasing the audience for content by exposing it to your audience, hopefully leading to healthy discourse about content and the ideas behind it. The mindless liking of ‘stuff’ has the potential of a dumbing down thinking. By liking and faving we may well only be providing mindless positive reinforcement, and avoiding critiquing stuff. Lets face it, a lot of stuff that is being shared on the web really needs to be critiqued. Ideas get better, and the world gets better, when we, collectively, are willing to deeply consider and develop ideas, share those ideas and be willing to receive honest and considered critique. Its nice to receive positive feedback, but it may not be healthy to receive only positive feedback. Ideas need to be shared, and ideas need to be challenged. Micro.blog users Jean MacDonald and Shannon Hager have both recently on undertaking what Jean referred to as a ‘Like fast’. I think this has potential – let’s stop mindlessly liking stuff, and mindfully replying to, critiquing and sharing ideas. Starting with this post. Not on micro.blog, where at the moment favourites are visible only to the Like-or.  ↩ Of course, it goes without saying that sharing an idea for discussion doesn’t mean endorsement…  ↩ Also published on Medium. This post also appears on: Medium desparoz.com Related
2017-12-07 7:23 pm
|
Reply
desparoz
desparoz
I’ve been thinking a little more about what Jack Baty wrote about the notion that likes on social networks should be private. Jack suggests that likes (and faves, and hearts, and…) should be visible only to the “Like-or and the Like-ee”. For the Like-or, Jack’s approach allows them to keep a list of things they have liked, and to send a vote of thanks to the author. The Like-ee receives said vote of thanks[1]. Personally I like the first part – a list of the things I have favourited in a service like micro.blog would be a useful thing. If there was a JSON/RSS feed, or if I could use an API to do something with things I favourite with a service like IFTTT, then I could do useful thing with those Favourited items, such as: add them to a link blog add them to a bookmarking service like Pinboard append the item to a note or next actions list These are good uses of Likes and Favourites. The second part – the vote of thanks – could be a good thing, if (and IMHO ony if) that aspect is private as Jack suggested. The problem I am seeing is that many people put very little thought into Likes ’and Faves. Clicking a link to Like or Favourite favourite takes a single second, and even less thought. People do it routinely, move on and often give no more thought whatsoever to the topic. IMHO, the best way of registering thanks and supporting the efforts of the author is to take a few moments and to write a meaningful reply — perhaps in a comment, or better yet perhaps by making your own (micro) blog post — and linking back to the original. What I am suggesting is to take mindful action, expressing what it is you like in a way that gives real feedback to the author. Sharing is important, because as micro.blog user John Johnston mentioned, curation is important. One of my key personal uses of micro.blog at the moment is as a link blog for interesting things I’ve stumbled on across the web[2]. Sharing has the potential of increasing the audience for content by exposing it to your audience, hopefully leading to healthy discourse about content and the ideas behind it. The mindless liking of ‘stuff’ has the potential of a dumbing down thinking. By liking and faving we may well only be providing mindless positive reinforcement, and avoiding critiquing stuff. Lets face it, a lot of stuff that is being shared on the web really needs to be critiqued. Ideas get better, and the world gets better, when we, collectively, are willing to deeply consider and develop ideas, share those ideas and be willing to receive honest and considered critique. Its nice to receive positive feedback, but it may not be healthy to receive only positive feedback. Ideas need to be shared, and ideas need to be challenged. Micro.blog users Jean MacDonald and Shannon Hager have both recently on undertaking what Jean referred to as a ‘Like fast’. I think this has potential – let’s stop mindlessly liking stuff, and mindfully replying to, critiquing and sharing ideas. Starting with this post. Not on micro.blog, where at the moment favourites are visible only to the Like-or.  ↩ Of course, it goes without saying that sharing an idea for discussion doesn’t mean endorsement…  ↩ Also published on Medium. This post also appears on: Medium desparoz.com Related
2017-12-07 7:23 pm
|
Reply
desparoz
desparoz
I’ve been thinking a little more about what Jack Baty wrote about the notion that likes on social networks should be private. Jack suggests that likes (and faves, and hearts, and…) should be visible only to the “Like-or and the Like-ee”. For the Like-or, Jack’s approach allows them to keep a list of things they have liked, and to send a vote of thanks to the author. The Like-ee receives said vote of thanks[1]. Personally I like the first part – a list of the things I have favourited in a service like micro.blog would be a useful thing. If there was a JSON/RSS feed, or if I could use an API to do something with things I favourite with a service like IFTTT, then I could do useful thing with those Favourited items, such as: add them to a link blog add them to a bookmarking service like Pinboard append the item to a note or next actions list These are good uses of Likes and Favourites. The second part – the vote of thanks – could be a good thing, if (and IMHO ony if) that aspect is private as Jack suggested. The problem I am seeing is that many people put very little thought into Likes ’and Faves. Clicking a link to Like or Favourite favourite takes a single second, and even less thought. People do it routinely, move on and often give no more thought whatsoever to the topic. IMHO, the best way of registering thanks and supporting the efforts of the author is to take a few moments and to write a meaningful reply — perhaps in a comment, or better yet perhaps by making your own (micro) blog post — and linking back to the original. What I am suggesting is to take mindful action, expressing what it is you like in a way that gives real feedback to the author. Sharing is important, because as micro.blog user John Johnston mentioned, curation is important. One of my key personal uses of micro.blog at the moment is as a link blog for interesting things I’ve stumbled on across the web[2]. Sharing has the potential of increasing the audience for content by exposing it to your audience, hopefully leading to healthy discourse about content and the ideas behind it. The mindless liking of ‘stuff’ has the potential of a dumbing down thinking. By liking and faving we may well only be providing mindless positive reinforcement, and avoiding critiquing stuff. Lets face it, a lot of stuff that is being shared on the web really needs to be critiqued. Ideas get better, and the world gets better, when we, collectively, are willing to deeply consider and develop ideas, share those ideas and be willing to receive honest and considered critique. Its nice to receive positive feedback, but it may not be healthy to receive only positive feedback. Ideas need to be shared, and ideas need to be challenged. Micro.blog users Jean MacDonald and Shannon Hager have both recently on undertaking what Jean referred to as a ‘Like fast’. I think this has potential – let’s stop mindlessly liking stuff, and mindfully replying to, critiquing and sharing ideas. Starting with this post. Not on micro.blog, where at the moment favourites are visible only to the Like-or.  ↩ Of course, it goes without saying that sharing an idea for discussion doesn’t mean endorsement…  ↩ Also published on Medium. This post also appears on: Medium desparoz.com Related
2017-12-07 7:23 pm
|
Reply
johnbrayton
johnbrayton

@macgenie Same here. I find it refreshing that micro.blog has no way to see likes, retweets, or followers. // @manton.

2017-06-10 7:49 pm
|
Reply
sirshannon
sirshannon

@desparoz I make weird little New Years Resolutions each year. In 2015, it was to not "like" or "fave" anything. Sometimes it made me feel free, sometimes it made me feel like an asshole. Note: faves can also be used to surface content, for better or worse.

2017-06-10 1:02 pm
|
Reply
johnjohnston
johnjohnston

@desparoz I'd probably be liking or retweeting this if it was on twitter;-) really important esp the receiving of criticism & likes. There is also curation I've an 'enviable stuff' category on my blog for quotes I am mostly not smart enough to add to or critique but I love.

2017-06-10 11:00 am
|
Reply
johnjohnston
johnjohnston

@macgenie thanks I've huffduffed the audio for later. Lots to ponder and micro.blog has been generating good questions around liking commenting etc. this is a good watch although I've never got to end

2017-06-10 10:50 am
|
Reply
In reply to
desparoz
desparoz

@macgenie The idea of a like fast is interesting. Likes can have merit, for the "I see you" thing, but all too often liking and sharing are confused with actual taking of action.

Also, the lack of a 'dislike' function means that we tend now to get only positive reinforcement, or none-at-all. Critiquing is an important skill, and being able to give critique is important.

As is the skill to receive it.

I think the like/fave/share/retweet phenomenon has the tendency to break the give/receive feedback cycle.

But I might be wrong.

2017-06-10 10:03 am
|
Reply
macgenie
macgenie

@johnjohnston On The Run Loop episode with @manton, @collindonnell said "I guess I have to respond in meaningful ways and then people will know I'm here." Episode2: overcast.fm/+I-LJQ1GF...

2017-06-10 9:54 am
|
Reply
johnjohnston
johnjohnston

@macgenie I know and will talk the 'likes are mindless' argument. But as a long term, small fry blogger I need any acknowledgement of my existence I can get.

2017-06-10 8:24 am
|
Reply
macgenie
macgenie

@desparoz A good friend went on a Like "fast" on Facebook and I thought it was a good idea, so I did it too for a couple months. I found it challenging after a while, because I do like to acknowledge that "I see you" quickly. But it is worth reexamining our mindless behavior.

2017-06-10 12:41 am
|
Reply
desparoz
desparoz

@macgenie I really wanted to re-micro.post that!

I am trying to write a piece at the moment about likes, faves, retweeting and sharing, and the basic premise is that much liking, faving, etc is mindless.

A much better thing to do is to put mindful thought into a reply or a share. A reply (like this) forces us to pause and think about what it is we like about something...

2017-06-10 12:30 am
|
Reply
macgenie
macgenie

Apparently I’m addicted to likes and retweets, both giving them and getting them. Micro.blog is rehab, and @manton is my addictions counselor.

2017-06-10 12:22 am
|
Reply