Micro.blog

strengthentheverbs
strengthentheverbs

Micro.blog is the best of everything: Your Twitter, Medium, and LinkedIn accounts (Tumblr and Mastadon, if you use those), and your independent blog — all in one. Your words and conversations remain yours, no matter what happens on the corporate-controlled sites. Save yourself.

nekr0z
nekr0z

@strengthentheverbs What if something happens to micro.blog though? I mean, it’s still some platform that you don’t control and that has all your data. What if they close their shop tomorrow?

strengthentheverbs
strengthentheverbs

@nekr0z That's why you purchase your own URL that can take anywhere. Or you use Micro.blog to post to your own WordPress website. I actually haven't taken all the steps myself because I'm not that tech savvy.

gpittman
gpittman

@strengthentheverbs I’m still trying to figure out what I would use Micro.blog for. I already have a WordPress site. Micro.blog seems redundant unless I use it to post to Twitter just to make sure I keep ownership of my tweets.

nekr0z
nekr0z

@strengthentheverbs Having your own domain is a first step, but definitely not a complete solution: yes, you keep your identity when micro.blog is gone, but you lose all your content. Having your own website (and options are definitely not limited to WordPress here) is actually the answer, but that makes micro.blog altogether unnecessary.

nekr0z
nekr0z

@gpittman In my experience, Brid.gy is a much more flexible instrument when it comes to controlling and owning your tweets from your own website.

strengthentheverbs
strengthentheverbs

@nekr0z Is Micro.blog unnecessary? It depends on what you're looking for. If you just want internet independence, then perhaps that's true. May I ask why you're here?

strengthentheverbs
strengthentheverbs

@gpittman For me, Micro.blog is a positive place to interact, without ads, where the timeline remains chronological and uncluttered, and instead of arguing about what makes them angry, people share things they create and enjoy.

In reply to
DrKnittyGritty
DrKnittyGritty

@nekr0z In my understanding of the micro.blog platform, ownership of your content is exactly what micro.blog hopes to achieve. If for whatever reason Micro.blog stops, as a user we can downlod all content and upload it again to a different platform. In most ways that is the same as with Wordpress. I can understand that if you have a wordpress site, micro.blog would have limited value as a standalone. That said, the community behind micro.blog connects these sites so that you do not have to fiddle around with contact forms or accounts of visiters on your website if they want to reply to your post.

gpittman
gpittman

@strengthentheverbs That is a nice thing about Micro.blog. As it was about App.net. I really liked App.net. Twitter started out that way. But the inertia of onboarding new users is strong. Platforms morph over time. I’ve been on Twitter since the beginning. Different place now.

gpittman
gpittman

@strengthentheverbs I’m not at all trying to be argumentative. I’ve only recently heard about Micro.blog so I’m still trying to figure it out. I already have a self-hosted WordPress site so I already own my material. That isn’t a big concern for me.

nekr0z
nekr0z

@strengthentheverbs I’m here for several reasons. One is the fact that, as you’ve already aptly pointed out, the community here is positive. Another reason is that it was extremely easy to setup. The main reason, probably, is the fact that I’m a big IndieWeb afficionado, and micro.blog being heavily rooted in IndieWeb protocols makes me want to support it.

nekr0z
nekr0z

@DrKnittyGritty You’re right, and yet this is probably the one thing that frustrates me about micro.blog the most: micro.blog does everything it can to drag you in. You can’t reply to a micro.blog post from your own site without being registered at micro.blog. You don’t receive webmentions on your site from the conversations you participate in on micro.blog. Instead of being a good IndieWeb citizen, micro.blog actively tries to be the center, the single point to concentrate your social interactions, and, admittedly, is quite good at it.

strengthentheverbs
strengthentheverbs

@gpittman Every time I go to Twitter, I have little interest in interacting there anymore, let alone saving tweets. It's secondary to my microblog, and I cross-post there only because I can. I use Micro.blog for the positive interactions, simplicity, and calming white space.

gpittman
gpittman

@strengthentheverbs That’s understandable. Twitter is a different place than it used to be. And that’s why I really liked App.net. I just haven’t found the content I might be interested in longterm here on Micro.blog. But I’m going to hang around a while and see how it develops.

chrisaldrich
chrisaldrich

@nekr0z I'm curious if you may have blocked incoming webmentions from micro.blog in webmention.io? (I've accidentally done it once or twice for other domains.) Look at: webmention.io/settings/... to see if that's the root of your issue. I have my own stand-alone WordPress site and frequently get webmentions from micro.blog. Here's an example: https://boffosocko.com/2020/04/25/55770533/#comment-285985.

I also frequently reply to others on micro.blog without issues, though depending on how they set their preferences, micro.blog sites have the choice of either showing or not showing Webmentions. (And this is a relatively new feature that's supported in the past few months.)

If you're having issues on the back-and-forth, you should definitely ping @manton, who I've always found to be incredibly helpful.

I rarely visit micro.blog on the web since I read all of the sites I'm following on it either individually in my feed reader or in aggregate using the feed: micro.blog/feeds/c.j... (You can get yours by replacing the "c" with your username. I'll also mention that Inoreader pushed some changes for titleless posts in December that makes the presentation of feeds from micro.blog much better than most other feed readers.) Since all the comments on my posts come back to me as webmentions, I never really need to visit its site other than occasional visits to the "discover" tabs to see things that don't make my personal feed.

nekr0z
nekr0z
@DrKnittyGritty

You’re right, and yet this is probably the one thing that frustrates me about micro.blog the most: micro.blog does everything it can to drag you in. You can’t reply to a micro.blog post from your own site without being registered at micro.blog. You don’t receive webmentions on your site from the conversations you participate in on micro.blog. Instead of being a good IndieWeb citizen, micro.blog actively tries to be the center, the single point to concentrate your social interactions, and, admittedly, is quite good at it.