Micro.blog

ChrisJWilson
ChrisJWilson

@GR36 I understand this statement. microblog really isn’t a twitter replacement. It’s something different and I’m okay with that.

gui
gui

@GR36 I have the same feeling. It feels “empty”

ChrisJWilson
ChrisJWilson

@gui @gr36 to me, that has some appeal though. I think there’s a casual-ness missing from micro.blog there’s just a tiny bit more friction everywhere (plus I miss rich previews).

quico
quico

@ChrisJWilson @gui @gr36 Many of us are tying our own web identity to micro.blog. That may lead us to “behave”—to be serious and avoid daring statements. We‘re more detached from Twitter, and maybe it’s that detachment what makes Twitter funny and what we’re missing here.

ChrisJWilson
ChrisJWilson

@quico @gui @gr36 it’s certainly possible. I believe that if Twitter was perfect, there would still be a place of micro.blog. With twitter in disarray it changes how people look at microblog.

philbowell
philbowell

@GR36 I think a lot of that revolves around lack of feedback. There’s no indication that anyone is there for most of the time, no subtle feedbacks or knowledge that you have followers.

philbowell
philbowell

@GR36 yeh, it’s a trade off and there are merits, but I’ve started realise how much those little interactions help to build relationships.

philbowell
philbowell

@GR36 it’s kind of like body language, someone acknowledging what you said has credit but in that instance it doesn’t necessarily require anything more.

EddieHinkle
EddieHinkle
@philbowell Yeah, I think you’re right. I think if something like Slack reactions gets built in, that will add a lot. It’s amazing how much Slack reactions add to the relationship with my coworkers as a remote employee.
philbowell
philbowell

@EddieHinkle yep, it’s subtle but helpful