Micro.blog

kicks
kicks

Re: Arduous Interfaces

Might we be converging on hatred?

bradenslen
bradenslen

@kicks "Familiarity breeds contempt."

That's the first aspect that comes to mind. It doesn't matter if its a small town, where everybody knows each other and what they are doing or a small group online. The difference is, in a small town or at work, is you can't just leave, so you learn to tolerate the differences and, percieved, faults of others and still remain civil. It takes a mental discipline we have trouble extending online. Maybe in part, because we don't feel accountable.

When I first joined forums and later social networks I purposely used my name, because I wanted to hold myself accountable with anything I posted online. It was common practice back in the forum days to use a nickname. It was my way of forcing self discipline that I wouldn't say anything online that I wouldn't say to somebody face to face.

Moderating forum communities is something I've done a lot of and it's a task I'm glad to be rid of now. A couple of features of some forum scripts that I miss:

  1. The ability for mods to either combine threads (we don't need 20 threads about blue widgets, let's splice them all together.) And the ability to seperate off topic portions of a thread.

  2. The ability to in some way archive particularly good useful threads or posts into a sort of knowledge base for others to use in the future. Both of these hit on the librarian function.

In reply to
odd
odd

@bradenslen Well said! I’m old enough to have been in the forums as well.

“It was common practice back in the forum days to use a nickname.”

And it was also common to have a sig.

Slightly off topic: I remember Outlook Express got a lot of heat because they used “—” as a sig separator instead of “— ”…

cambridgeport90
cambridgeport90

@odd I used to love that thing, so I'm frankly surpriseed I don't remember it at all.

kicks
kicks
@bradenslen To me, using a real name to hold yourself accountable is kind of like using religion to make yourself behave. It gives you a good feeling of being on the right side—but imagine how much more meaningful it could be to act well without that external incentive. You really can behave just as well with a psuedonym if you mean to. (I tend to think of this as bonhomminity.) Still, you might be right. I’m not going to defend pseudonyms too deeply—I just think they are fun. They do remind us that this is not really us. It’s just a virtual representation and is different somehow. I still think online handles are as relevant as ever in these times.