cliffordbeshers
cliffordbeshers

Same Coopers Hawk as yesterday, same tree, different pose.

A juvenile Coopers Hawk sits on a branch of a dead tree, surveying a desert valley.

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jemostrom
jemostrom

@cliffordbeshers 👏🏻

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Miraz
Miraz

@cliffordbeshers Very nice, though I wouldn't want it looking at me too closely.

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bradenslen
bradenslen

@cliffordbeshers We have a Coopers Hawk that hunts song birds here in the subdivision. The Blue Jays love to irritate it, as they do. I'm told, Coopers Hawks are not native to this area but somehow they moved in over the last couple of decades. At least I get to see the Coopers up close from my porch, whereas the larger Redtail Hawks (native) I only see from a distance. Nice photos!

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cliffordbeshers
cliffordbeshers

@Miraz You wouldn't be in danger, but your quail...well, I've seen them disappear in a blink.

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cliffordbeshers
cliffordbeshers

@bradenslen Thanks! What area have they moved into?

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Miraz
Miraz

@cliffordbeshers 😳

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cliffordbeshers
cliffordbeshers

@Miraz My neighbor is a biologist/birder and her response is always : everbody's gotta eat.

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Miraz
Miraz

@cliffordbeshers Well, true!

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bradenslen
bradenslen

@cliffordbeshers The very southern tip of Lake Michigan.

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In reply to
cliffordbeshers
cliffordbeshers

@bradenslen Okay, I guess the year-round range has moved northward. I'm going to look for maps over time. I know I've seen that in articles, but I don't know of a standing resource.

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bradenslen
bradenslen

@cliffordbeshers If it's moved up from the South, it makes some sense. Our winters are much milder than they were 40 years ago.

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