Micro.blog

twelvety
twelvety
That nagging feeling about digital journal apps twelvety.micro.blog
ChrisJWilson
ChrisJWilson

@twelvety I feel your pain. I'm still using DayOne (plus?) and there's a lot I like, but I also wished it was more plain text files focused...but then it wouldn't support images so well. As you say, paper is good too.

jack
jack

@twelvety I hear ya! Mine are a mess. As plain and boring as it is, I feel like org-journal is the only place I trust forever, so I've been going there most. Well, there and my paper notebooks. But Day One and/or Diarly feel so good and work better with images. I should just pick one but know I never will.

petebrown
petebrown

@twelvety I went through this a few years ago, and have settled on pen and paper for everything. With a notebook in my pocket, it no less convenient than typing something into my phone, and I have grown increasingly skeptical that digital anything will outlast analog/physical in any practical sense. Additionally, my experience has been that the overhead of scanning/syncing/whatever is not worth it.

ronguest
ronguest

@twelvety I struggle with this area as well. ISTR trying Diarly but it only allowed one entry per day. Am I right about that?

So far I am still using a non-subscription version of DayOne. I mainly make use of having a couple of different journals, multiple entries per day, inclusion of a photo or two, import from my blog (i.e. when I blog something it goes in a blogging journal automatically, tagging, and the “on this day” feature. Oh and sync across all my Apple devices. I guess it is a long list because I haven’t come across an alternative.

twelvety
twelvety

@ChrisJWilson I'm with you! It's like I want the encryption, and the photos, and the text files, all in one thing.

twelvety
twelvety

@jack This does not give me hope for the future! ;) Maybe I should approach digital journal stuff like my FLAC music library, which is for long-term storage, and iTunes Match has easily accessible 256k versions of what's in it. Org-journal could be the canonical place to store things, and Day One or Diarly could get easily accessible "renders" of what's in it. Eh, I don't know.

twelvety
twelvety

@petebrown This is probably the right answer in the end, but I still want to search everything. The problem has never been "I can't access my stuff anymore". It's always "which password protected encrypted app/service do I search to find the thing I know is in one of these databases somewhere?" And the other problem (when searching) is "is this something that never made it to digital because whatever tool I was enamored with at the time was too cumbersome to use?"

twelvety
twelvety

@ronguest Close! Diarly has "one" entry per day, but you can add multiple timestamps to it, so they function like little mini entries. I like it a lot better than Day One's method of tons of individual separate entries on each day. But Day One is a great choice for rich, encrypted journal entries with tons of metadata. And "On This Day" is killer. I think I need spaced repetition for journal pages (like people do with flashcards). Like, each day, show me one (or a few) random day's entries from the past. Like "On This Day", but not the same entries on the same day every year.

petebrown
petebrown

@twelvety TOTALLY. I struggled with giving up searchability, but what I came to find after switching fully back to pen and paper was that 1) I search for stuff much less frequently than I thought, and 2) when I do need to search my journals and pocket notebooks, I tend to have a good enough idea of where to start that it doesn’t take much page-flipping to find what I’m looking for. That said; I also think it mostly comes to personal preferences, and YMMV.

twelvety
twelvety

@petebrown @jack Ok, I've realized a couple of things about searching. I search more often for things that I remember taking as "notes" in the bullet journal. Now, whether I processed those into the right reference bucket or note system is another matter, but yes, I think I'm with you in thinking that journaled entries don't need Search so much. As Jack points out, journaling is a different thing/process (and one I need to actually do more of), but what's screwing up my Notes vs. Journal dividing line is TiddlyWiki and Roam! The line was blurry with TW, and now that Roam is so hyper-fast and bi-directional, the line is completely fuzzy.

This actually happened last week: I wrote a Journal entry in Roam about a lunch I had with co-workers, but there were lots of CRM-style notes about those people that were... Notes. I say that TW and Roam are making it worse, but really, they're just scratching an itch I've had for a long time.

Abandon hope!

jack
jack

@twelvety The TiddlyBlink thing is a great approach to making TiddlyWiki more Roam-like. But... Roam is actually Roam and now that's all I can see. Abandon hope is right!