Micro.blog

jamesshelley
jamesshelley

Why do I keep my social accounts? For me, the main (and, I think, only) function of social media is to exchange email addresses and cell numbers — exactly so we can get on with coordinating community spaces together, beyond proprietary, online platforms.

joshducharme
joshducharme

@jamesshelley Does that include the discovery function of finding new and interesting people and ideas?

jamesshelley
jamesshelley

@joshducharme Serendipity can happen anywhere, as far as I can tell. But I’m really curious as to what happens next: do our relationships simply remain mediated by these corporate third-parties platforms? or do we go on to do things together in the world in some way?

In reply to
seishonagon
seishonagon

@jamesshelley that sounds reductive. I keep “in touch” (for various values of “in touch”) with a crowd of people I’ve met in very different places over the year. It’s a mix of a newspaper’s social page, a yearly Christmas letter and a long-distance, letter-based chess game.

joshducharme
joshducharme

@jamesshelley Interesting. As a very curious introvert, social media has primarily helped me find a bunch of very smart, interesting people to learn from. Combine my extreme introversion with knowing others are much smarter than me, I tend not to interact unless…

joshducharme
joshducharme

@jamesshelley I’m fairly certain I have something valuable to contribute. Hence, social media is mostly one-way for me, and my primary value is the new ideas I’m exposed to and can integrate. It wouldn’t occur to me to value what you do. Thanks for the perspective.

jamesshelley
jamesshelley

@seishonagon I suspect many people find value in social media in different ways. My statement was redunctionistic in that it was prompted by a personal question: when I use it, what do I do with it? The answer, for me, is that social media is more like a dynamic directory service than anything else. The ”keeping in touch” part for me happens through other tools.